James Monroe (1758-1831)


Monroe, James (1758-1831) & Adams, John Q. (1767-1848)

Document signed by both (patent for farming implement)

5. President and 6. President of the United States. Partly printed document signed "James Monroe” as President" and “John Quincy Adams" as Secretary of States. Additionally signed by U.S. Attorney General William Wirt (1772-1834) as "Wm Wirt" along bottom. 2pp. (recto and verso), 11.0 x 14.5 inch, on vellum, Washington, 1824 April 16. The patent document is bound to a double-sided schedule containing a detailed description of the invention. Handsome paper seal at lower left, the left edge and seal threaded with a black ribbon. The document reads in part: "The United States of America. To all to whom these Letters Patent shall come: Whereas, Martin Stevens a Citizen of the United States, hath alleged that he has invented a new and useful improvement in the mode of making Steel Dung-forks, with four or more tines, without riveting or welding out of a solid Bar of Steel, which improvement he states has not been known or used before his application…" Overall in near fine condition, with expected toning, wrinkles, and folds. Martin Stevens, a mechanic from Waterbury, Connecticut, petitioned for a patent in October 1823. His invention was a four-tined dung fork whose manufacture did not require extra heat or labor, thus producing a cheaper and stronger product. With Steven's dung fork, homesteaders could easily "remove manure and dig potatoes" along with a host of other agricultural tasks. The Industrial Revolution was in full swing when Martin Stevens received his patent on April 16, 1824. He was 1 of 12 inventors from New England, the mid-Atlantic states, and the Midwest to receive patents from the U.S. Government that month. Their inventions ranged from modifications to ploughs, locks, and suction pumps, to improvements on stove box hearths and steam engines. James Monroe, one of America's Founding Fathers and the last president of the "Virginia Dynasty," ushered the nation into both the nineteenth century and the Era of Good Feelings. Monroe first became involved in revolutionary politics as a teenaged orphan when he stormed the Virginia Governor's palace; he was later wounded at the Battle of Trenton. Monroe studied law under then Governor of Virginia Thomas Jefferson. His brilliant political career included stints as Continental Congressional delegate, Virginia Senator, Virginia Governor, U.S. Minister to France, U.S. Minister to the United Kingdom, U.S. Secretary of State, U.S. Secretary of War, and finally 5th U.S. President (1817-1825.). John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) succeeded Monroe as U.S. President just 13 months after signing this document in his role as Secretary of State. John Quincy trained as a lawyer and joined the foreign service, representing his young country's interests in the Netherlands, Prussia, Russia, and the United Kingdom. John Quincy was also a Senator and Congressman from Massachusetts. He served as 8th Secretary of State before entering the White House in March 1825.

 

Price: $ 2,450 / € 1.885

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Autograph letter signed

Autograph letter signed “Jas. Monroe”. 1p. (double page), 7.5 x 9.25 inch, n.p., 1794 August 25. In full: “Mr. Leavenworth will be pleased to send me five or six thousand livres by the bearer". Lightly toned, slight creasing and usual mail folds, two pieces of tape on verso. Monroe was appointed by George Washington to be his minister to France, and arrived there on July 31, 1794. Robespierre had been killed only a few days prior, and Monroe's reception at the Committee of Public Safety was brusque, given the circumstances. It is unknown what the requested amount of money was intended for.

 

Price: $ 940 / € 725

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